Posts Tagged ‘60 Minutes’

“Seven Presidents Have Failed…”

December 14, 2009

On 60 Minutes last night, Barack Obama claimed that seven presidents have tried and failed to reform health care.  Follow-up questions I would have asked:

1.  Didn’t President Bush sign the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement and Modernization Act in 2003?

2. Wasn’t part of that act a provision to add pretax health savings accounts for working people so that people can control more of their health expenditures?

3. If you were to analyze this major health legislation, what parts would you say are having a positive impact and which negative?

4. Do you think the parts that expanded government’s role in health care are positive or negative and why?

5.  Do you think the HSA’s are having a positive or negative impact and why?

6.  If I were Steve Kroft and I had just implied that the 2,000 page health care reform bill was a monstrosity and the President changed the subject by essentially saying, “seven Presidents have failed, but we’re close,” I might have asked, “Is this monstrosity better than failing to pass something?”

I understand there are a couple of dynamics at play.  You can’t upset the President too much or he won’t come on your show and you won’t get ratings.  Also, there is still a halo of infallibility with this guy, so journalists are having a hard time coming to grips with the fact that he is a human after all, and maybe, just maybe, it’s a bit much to expect someone to go from junior senator to legendary world leader in a year’s time.

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Tick, tick, tick, tick

December 14, 2009

Ricky Gervais, creator of the television show The Office, and Andy Rooney both lamented about how much money they have on this evening’s 60 Minutes.  Ricky said that he doesn’t work harder than a lot of other folks, but earns many multiples of their income.  He said that a large part of his success was due to luck.

I agree.  Nassim Taleb, author of the Black Swan and Fooled by Randomness, educated me on how much luck plays in the success of successful people.  As Taleb says, we always hear about the successful people but never about the just as talented people who aren’t as successful because they just haven’t had their lucky break.  Sometimes it’s as simple as meeting the right person at a party.

But, I will give Ricky something, he does have talent.  He makes me laugh.  I enjoy his humor, acting and writing.  Not to say that others aren’t as deserving, but any dollars Ricky has of mine in his pocket were well earned.

Rooney seemed bothered by having more than his share, but comforted by the fact that he doesn’t have as much as others.  He referenced the Forbes 400 list of the richest 400 people as proof.

What bothered me: C’mon guys.  Rather than feel down about being wealthy, celebrate it.  Encourage others.  Tell us how awesome it is that we live in a world where you can follow your dreams, work hard and be rewarded.  Acknowledge, as Ricky did, that there is some luck to it, but one thing is for certain – they wouldn’t have been successful if they hadn’t tried.

And, if you don’t have a dream but can still live a decent, comfortable life as a nurse, engineer, electrician or some other chosen profession, that’s awesome too.  Compared to how people lived a century ago or how people live in other parts of the world (some within a day’s drive for most of us) – we are all rock stars.  That something that we should feel good about it.

We should be asking ourselves why that is.  What are the root causes that allow each of us live better than royalty in the past in exchange for an honest day’s work?  We should want more of that.

They showed an 80s video of Ricky taking a stab at the music business.  Apparently it didn’t work out.  He wasn’t bothered by it.  He seemed to recognize that all things don’t work out, but trying matters.

Tick, tick, tick

December 14, 2009

In an interview on 60 Minutes this evening, Obama blamed Wall Street bankers for the nation’s financial troubles.  If I remember correctly, the question was asked if banks are repaying TARP funds so they could pay their CEOs big bonuses.  To that, Obama said that he thinks that’s a motivation and that Wall Street still doesn’t get it that everyone is mad at them for causing the financial mess (paraphrased from memory).

What’s sad is that many American accept this explanation and we never hold government accountable for their role in the mess.

A true leader would own up to it.  Wall Street certainly played a role in the financial crisis, but they by no means acted alone.  This is where journalism needs to DO IT’S JOB!

Here are some great questions I would have loved to ask President Obama at that point:

1.  Do you think the government or government agencies had any role in the financial crisis or did Wall Street act alone?

2. Do you believe the Federal Reserve should have acted quicker to remove excess money supply after it seemed that the economy got back on track after 9/11?

3. You don’t believe that government put pressure on banks to make credit easier (i.e. lend to people they would normally consider high credit risks) in order to push this idea of expanding home ownership?

4. Didn’t the government provide implicit guarantees to subprime lending, again to expand home ownership, through Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac?

5. Wasn’t Fannie and Freddie one of the largest, if not largest, provider of these bad loans?  And weren’t they acting under direction from Congress?

6.  Weren’t regulations proposed in 2004 that would have reduced the risk of the housing crisis by making it tougher to get loans, but those regulations were rejected by Congress because they would have interfered with the goal of expanding home ownership?

6.  In order for us to better trust your leadership, shouldn’t we expect you to be honest about government’s role in the financial mess?  Rather, you seem to pretend that government has not blame and we should continue to blindly trust the government as you want to expand regulatory power even further.

7. Please tell me, how are the new financial regulatory powers that your administration is proposing different from those in 2004?  Why didn’t the current regulations not work to prevent the crisis?  Did anyone in government not even recognize that a crisis was about to happen?  If not, how can we trust those in government to recognize the next crisis?

8. What do you think about the people who borrowed well beyond their means?  Shouldn’t they have acted more prudently?  Shouldn’t we expect our citizens, who are provided thirteen years of education with a total valued at $150,000, to make responsible financial choices?  Shouldn’t we expect them to be able to read and understand a loan document and do their homework about the realities and responsibilities that come with home ownership?

9. What personal finance advice would you give Americans?

10.  Some say that people were motivated to borrow beyond their means because they felt that home prices were appreciating so rapidly that they could always sell the house and make a nice profit.  In other words, they were borrowing on future hopes rather than their realistic income.  Don’t you think that the government’s finances are reflecting that same behavior?  We are borrowing beyond our means with the hope that the economy will grow strong and pay for it.  Haven’t we learned our lesson here?  Don’t we know how this story is likely to end?

Tick-tick-tick…

November 30, 2009

I saw a piece on 60 Minutes last night about the blood tainted gold from the Congo that reminded me of why I have such little regard for journalism.

The story: There’s gold and political instability in the Congo, which lead to heinous power struggles and gangster violence, rapes and other human rights violations.  The culprits?  It must be those darned gold dealers.  Walmart and such.  They don’t track the gold back to the source, so they buy (by some “best estimates” provided in the story, 1%) of their gold from Congo sources which fuels the bloody power struggles.

Typical journalism.  Blame the end user.  Here are some questions or data I would have provided  if I were the reporter on this story:

1) What is the form of government in this country that allows such human rights abuses (that would be the killing and rapes) and power struggles for mineral rights to take place?

2) What is ineffective about Congo’s government compared with the governments of countries that apparently supply the other 99% of the world’s gold that doesn’t appear to be subject to such chaos?

3) Why do people stay in the Congo if it’s so bad?  Why don’t they leave for a better a life?

4) How would a gold dealer be able to tell if gold came from the Congo or not?  Do they simply take the gold seller’s word for it?  Do you honestly think that would be an effective way to end the violence in the Congo?  Even if gold could be traced to the source, you don’t think a black market would keep that gold flowing?